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The PAAT Research Update

PAAT RESEARCH 

Physical Activity and Active Transport (PAAT) Research Project began with the training of research assistants on data quality management i.e. data collection and quality control. This paved way for data collection. 
PAAT involves four research locations: Kenya, Nigeria, Mozambique and Canada. The Kenya site (Kenyatta University) serves as the coordinating centre for the project.

Data collection exercise which has been going on since February 2014 has been concluded in the 3 collaborating countries, where the areas involved are Urban, Peri/sub urban and Rural. Data entry that also began immediately after the completion of data collection in June has also been concluded, cleaned and ready to be analyzed.

PAAT Project, which is an IDRC-Canada funded Project, is a three year collaborative project. Its title is; Assessment of Physical Activity and Active Transport Among school children in Eastern, Western and Southern Regions of Africa: The case of Kenya, Nigeria and Mozambique".

The goal of this project is to promote Physical Activity through Active Transport in school going children.
The objectives of this research project include; consolidating the existing information on active transportation measurement instruments and published literature on active transportation among African children and youth; to develop or refine an instrument or protocol to collect physical activity data; to collect data on the physical activity and active transport among African school children living in urban, sub – urban and rural areas to help inform report cards from Kenya, Nigeria, and Mozambique; to collect and compare provincial/county, municipal, and school policies related to active transportation in the African countries where the data collection will be conducted; to develop a physical activity and active transport surveillance model for expansion to other low and middle income countries, building off the report card knowledge translation and dissemination process used in Canada and replicated in Kenya; and to provide recommendations for policy and programs that could be implemented based on the study findings and to suggest future research in the area. More generally, the overall goal of this project is to promote physical activity through active transport in school – aged children.

DATA COLLECTION
Using the valid and reliable instrument/method, a convenient, but stratified sample of 1000 children aged 10-12 years from each of Kenya, Nigeria and Mozambique were recruited to assess AT (Active Transport) and physical activity within each of these countries. Physical activity were objectively measured using new generation pedometers (PiezoStep and Activity Time pedometer, StepsCount, Deep River, ON) capable of measuring step count accumulations and estimating time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Participants were asked to wear a pedometer for 7 consecutive days. Participants were also asked to complete a short questionnaire on perceived barriers to AT (72). It is likely that transportation behaviours and policies differ markedly between different regions of Africa so the sample were stratified with an equal sample from urban, suburban/periurban and rural areas and balanced between males and females. Differences between countries, regions (e.g. urban vs. suburban vs. rural) and genders will be examined using analysis of variance and general linear models adjusted for potential confounders where appropriate (e.g. age, gender, school, region, country). Separate models will be made for AT and physical activity as dependent variables. The association between AT and perceived barriers will be assessed using Spearman correlations. The association between AT and physical activity will also be assessed (specific analyses will depend on the final measurement instruments and methods selected e.g. categorical vs continuous measures of AT). The comparison between regions will enable an assessment of the effect of the physical activity transition on AT (e.g., urban sample representing advanced transition compared to rural) and help inform the urgency and type of policy implementation required.


Dr. Kingsley Akinroye, the IDRC project investigator for the Nigerian site with his research team awarding a certificate to a school after a successful data collection.

 


Sylvester Hayker, PhD Candidate and project coordinator in Kenya, presenting a ball to a deputy head teacher after their school successfully participated in the IDRC funded project


A Mozambique school child with her correctly fitted pedometer,

 



Contact Information

Project Manager,

The PAAT Research,

Ms. June Owilli,

Kenyatta University,

P.O.Box 43844 - 00100

Nairobi, Kenya

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it



 

Contact Information

Project Leader,

The PAAT Research

Vincent O. Onywera, Ph.D, ISAK 2

Registrar,

Research, Innovation and Outreach,

Kenyatta University

P.O. Box 43844 - 00100

Nairobi, Kenya

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it



 

PAAT RESEARCH UPDATE

Physical Activity and Active Transport (PAAT) Research Project began with the training of research assistants on data quality management i.e. data collection and quality control. This paved way for data collection.  PAAT involves four research locations: Kenya, Nigeria, Mozambique and Canada. The Kenya site (Kenyatta University) serves as the coordinating centre for the project.

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Director
Healthy Active Kids Kenya (HAKK)
P.O Box 43844-00100 , Nairobi-KENYA
Tel: + 254-810901 Ext. 57284
E-mail: director@hakkenya.org

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